Eastman Johnson, 1824-1906

The Cranberry Harvest, Island of Nantucket, 1880
Oil on canvas, 69.5 x 138.4 cm (27-3/8 x 54-1/2 in.)

In 1870, after searching for aspects of American rural life to use as subjects for ambitious paintings, Johnson began to draw inspiration from Nantucket Island south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. With this view of a cranberry harvest, he successfully realized his efforts to paint a celebration of New England outdoor life.

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Fitz Henry Lane, 1804-1865
Castine Harbor and Town, 1851
Oil on canvas, 50.8 x 84.5 cm (20 x 33-1/4 in.)

Although known for his view of the harbors of Boston and Gloucester, Fitz Henry Lane was equally inspired by the Maine landscape. It became the subject of much of his most memorable and intensely poetic studio work from the 1850s until his death. His home base for many of his visits was the town of Castine, visible in the distance, across the harbor.

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Thomas Moran, 1837–1926
Opus 24: Rome, from the Campagna, Sunset, 1867
Oil on canvas, 63.5 x 114.6 cm (25 x 45-1/8 in.)

Thomas Moran painted Rome, from the Campagna, Sunset in his Philadelphia studio in June 1867, shortly after from his second trip abroad. The time spent in Europe gave Moran the opportunity to study thoroughly the work of historic and contemporary artists and to travel in Italy. Moran produced several sketches within Rome proper, but it was his experience in the Campagna, the landscape south of the city, that would inspire a dramatic transformation in his work.

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Raphaelle Peale, 1774–1825
Cutlet and Vegetables, 1816
Oil on panel, 46.4 x 61.5 cm (18-1/4 x 24-1/4 in.)

Raphaelle Peale was taught to paint by his father, Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827), an accomplished soldier, scientist, artist, and founder of a dynasty of early American painters.

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John F. Peto, 1854-1907
In the Library, 1894-1900
Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 101.6 cm (30 x 40 in.)

John F. Peto received his training at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he also exhibited his work from 1870 to 1887. Following a move to Island Heights, New Jersey, in 1889, Peto ceased to exhibit and ultimately was forgotten.

 

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